Chronic Yeast Infection Antibiotics

Acupuncture Is a successful Yeast Infection Treatment

Text on screen: Acupuncture How to Eliminate Yeast Infections, Thrush, and other CandidiasisRelated Conditions from Your Life Forever Chapter Two: What is Acupuncture How does it work to treat yeast infections? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Do you know what acupuncture does? Do you know anything about the history of acupuncture? FAITH: A little bit. I mean, I know that it has to do with energy and you have to have needles put in your body in different places. NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: It's an ancient art, but it's a science and it's very, very effective. The way it works is by, of course, placing metallic needles in the body. And we are a body electric; we're an electromagnetic being. And these needles send signals through the body and it basically awakens a natural blueprint that your body has innately and your body knows. And so, the needles effectively help you to connect with the part of you that is your natural healer, that knows the balance, that knows how things function.

And each needle is placed in a particular point that has, actually, a spirit name. And so when we take a history, when we think about how we are going to approach this patient, it's unique to the patient in that we think about these spirit names and how this patient has been fractured or hurt or on a physical level has pain in a certain area of the body. And so at that point we know where to place those needles, and that is what your body needs in order to reconnect with the natural blueprint that you were innately born with. FAITH: OK. And how young can a person start receiving acupuncture? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Oh, you know. Sometimes babies can run fevers. I've certainly treated a lot of babies. Children can get very sick in life and acupuncture's very effective for pediatrics. Through puberty, the stress level today in the children and the teenagers is very high, and I certainly treat a lot of teenagers very effectively. FAITH: So, you talk about being a; connecting everything, so somewhere along the way there was a disconnect because of situations along… NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Stress; 99 percent of all illness is stress. So some level of stress got into that person, into yourself or anyone that's just displaying symptoms or has a disease state. FAITH: So, again, would part of this also be learning to manage your stress along with, or reduce your stress along with the acupuncture?

NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Sure, absolutely. Sometimes the stress even belonged to someone you were with: a boss or a parent, and you take it on. So of course, yes. Do you have any questions about how acupuncture works, or do you know about it? FAITH: Actually, I just know that there are needles and, I mean, I've heard some people say it doesn't hurt. Some of them say there's a little sting, you know. But then they say it's all over the body at different places for different problems. So, yeah, I'm a little nervous about how it's gonna feel, and… NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Well, here in California we're welltrained. You know, it's six years of school to get the license. And we have a ; we see a lot of women that come into our . So, yeast infection is commonly treated by acupuncturists so we have a lot of experience with that. And as for the acupuncture needles being something that you might be uncomfortable with, they're very thin; they're the size of a hair. And when we insert them we usually use guide tubes, so it's really relatively painless. The one thing that you do feel is you'll feel a distending, kinda achy feeling when we get what we call chi at the end of the needle. And we need to do that in order to move the channel energy, which is basically what's going on with acupuncture is that we're inserting needles in the body related to the nervous system but not entirely part of the nervous system.

And what happens is it's like catching a fish on the line when you're out fishing; you feel that tug, initially. You'll feel that after I insert the needle. You'll feel kind of a distending. FAITH: Will it be pain? So it won't be, really, pain? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: It's different. You have to educate yourself. At first, it will be unfamiliar. So you might want to rush into thinking that, quot;Oh, is this painful? Well, no, actually, no.quot; So you know, you get used to it. And it's kind of an achy feeling. And that's what we want. If we don't get that, we're not really giving a treatment that can be as effective as if we do get that. And sometimes some needles are more guide needles so we need to get the chi effect at that needle more than, say, another needle. FAITH: How deep does it go? Is each one different? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Every situation calls for a different, kind of, sized needle maybe a different depth, so we're going to put them in in a way where they don't even break blood vessels. Because they're rounded at the tip, they aren't pointed like a hypodermic needle, so when they are inserted it usually pushes everything out of the way in the way that we insert them.

FAITH: And how long for each treatment? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: About 45 minutes. Sometimes we retain the needles for 30 minutes, but usually about 45 minutes. And we try to use as few as possible, so, you know, we don't put a lot of needles in. Maybe six to eight. That's about it. FAITH: OK. I do have a question: Why do the overthecounter treatments. Why, in your opinion, or your expert opinion, do they; have they not worked? And do they work for some women? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON:Well, I think that they do work for some women. Some women just have; they can have an issue where, you know, they just got married and quot;honeymoon syndromequot; or something. Or, you know, they took antibiotics and they never really took antibiotics and they developed a yeast infection. Some women go on birth control pills and birth control pills are something they're not used to and they develop one. There can be varying reasons. Maybe it's very hot and they're wearing the wrong kind of underwear, you know; there can just be a lot of issues. And so for somebody with a chronic one, it's usually more of a systemic problem and it's related to stress and it can be kind of a psychoemotional issue or it also can be just the way somebody is just operating their life and they might have more of a sympathetic reaction to life. Text on Screen: To continue watching the interview proceed to Chapter 3.

Case Study 20 Eric Bakker Chronic Candida Yeast Infection

I'm going to do another case history, andthis is going to be my case history. It's going to be quite different. This is a 25yearoldguy called Eric Bakker. In 1986, he was just turning 26. So this is my own personal story.You might like to hear my personal story on how I came to really develop a burning passionfor helping people like you out there with Candida.You may like to hear my own personal story about the yeast infection I used to have whenI was in my 20s. I used to live by myself in a small house in a place called Brisbanein Australia, and this little house was in a suburb that was prone to flooding. It wascheap rent, and I was working in a flourmill

at the time. I'd been living on my own forabout five years at that point. One week I would work the day shift. One week I'd workthe afternoon shift. And the following week, I would work the night shift.I started to feel increasingly stressed and tired and one winter developed a bad cough.It got worse to the point where I took an antibiotic. My little house was cold and damp,and I had to bail water out of my bedroom after it rained heavily. I did tell you itwas cheap rent. The walls were covered in a thin, moist film that I later discoveredwas mold. My diet wasn't the best at times. I was craving sweet foods, take out, and lotsof bread. Either my bowels were blocked or

I was experiencing diarrhea and lots of gas.I felt terrible, and my health was going downhill fast. My skin started to get itchy and I developeda bad case of athlete's foot and jock itch. To give you a background on all this, a fewyears prior, I had 13 amalgam fillings replaced over a period of two weeks in 1983. I startedto notice that my health was beginning to deteriorate and by early '85, I was feelingincreasingly anxious. I developed skin rashes, athlete's foot, and many manifestations ofa Candida yeast infection, all unbeknown to me at the time, including very strong sweetcravings. I had issues with my girlfriend who thoughtI was a hypochondriac because my health had

deteriorated to the point where I had to seekmedical help. But the was of little help because all the tests results came backnormal, and he wanted me to see a psychiatrist. I knew I wasn't going crazy. I knew that therewas something undermining my health, and I couldn't put a finger on it until I read theYeast Connection by William Crook and then later I read the Missing Diagnosis by Orion Truss. I've read about 50 books since then on Candida, but the first one byCrook was quite a good book. My girlfriend at the time started to doubtme and told me that my problems were all in my head. A view strongly supported by hermother and that I needed to wake up to myself.

See a shrink and take antidepressants. Idecided to end that unsupportive relationship and move out of their flat and had a garagesale a few weekends later to downsize. A naturopath was looking through some of my gear at a garagesale and asked me why I had dark circles under my eyes. I told her about my health and thefirst thing she told me was to get a hair analysis to determine the mercury levels becauseshe thought the mercury fillings being replaced, it could have caused a problem. And she saidthere may be a connection there with that and the Candida.I went to see her and showed her Crook's book, and what she said made a heck of a lotof sense. And I started getting treatment

for my yeast infection. Unfortunately, shedidn't walk me through a proper mercury detoxification, I felt very, very sick, and I had a bad Herxheimerreaction. I had a lot of vomiting and diarrhea for quite a few weeks. And this, in fact,was one of the lowest points in my life. When at one point, I had considered taking my ownlife because I was so unsupported. No one wanted to listen to me. I felt terrible. The told me I was nuts. My mother said I was crazy. My girlfriend didn't listen.Is it any wonder people jump off bridges or do crazy things? If no one is there to listento you at all, all the doors get closed in your face. There's no support at all. What'sthe point in living even? When you're at your

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