How Do You Treat A Yeast Infection While On Your Period

Acupuncture Is a successful Yeast Infection Treatment

Text on screen: Acupuncture How to Eliminate Yeast Infections, Thrush, and other CandidiasisRelated Conditions from Your Life Forever Chapter Two: What is Acupuncture How does it work to treat yeast infections? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Do you know what acupuncture does? Do you know anything about the history of acupuncture? FAITH: A little bit. I mean, I know that it has to do with energy and you have to have needles put in your body in different places. NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: It's an ancient art, but it's a science and it's very, very effective. The way it works is by, of course, placing metallic needles in the body. And we are a body electric; we're an electromagnetic being. And these needles send signals through the body and it basically awakens a natural blueprint that your body has innately and your body knows. And so, the needles effectively help you to connect with the part of you that is your natural healer, that knows the balance, that knows how things function.

And each needle is placed in a particular point that has, actually, a spirit name. And so when we take a history, when we think about how we are going to approach this patient, it's unique to the patient in that we think about these spirit names and how this patient has been fractured or hurt or on a physical level has pain in a certain area of the body. And so at that point we know where to place those needles, and that is what your body needs in order to reconnect with the natural blueprint that you were innately born with. FAITH: OK. And how young can a person start receiving acupuncture? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Oh, you know. Sometimes babies can run fevers. I've certainly treated a lot of babies. Children can get very sick in life and acupuncture's very effective for pediatrics. Through puberty, the stress level today in the children and the teenagers is very high, and I certainly treat a lot of teenagers very effectively. FAITH: So, you talk about being a; connecting everything, so somewhere along the way there was a disconnect because of situations along… NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Stress; 99 percent of all illness is stress. So some level of stress got into that person, into yourself or anyone that's just displaying symptoms or has a disease state. FAITH: So, again, would part of this also be learning to manage your stress along with, or reduce your stress along with the acupuncture?

NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Sure, absolutely. Sometimes the stress even belonged to someone you were with: a boss or a parent, and you take it on. So of course, yes. Do you have any questions about how acupuncture works, or do you know about it? FAITH: Actually, I just know that there are needles and, I mean, I've heard some people say it doesn't hurt. Some of them say there's a little sting, you know. But then they say it's all over the body at different places for different problems. So, yeah, I'm a little nervous about how it's gonna feel, and… NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Well, here in California we're welltrained. You know, it's six years of school to get the license. And we have a ; we see a lot of women that come into our . So, yeast infection is commonly treated by acupuncturists so we have a lot of experience with that. And as for the acupuncture needles being something that you might be uncomfortable with, they're very thin; they're the size of a hair. And when we insert them we usually use guide tubes, so it's really relatively painless. The one thing that you do feel is you'll feel a distending, kinda achy feeling when we get what we call chi at the end of the needle. And we need to do that in order to move the channel energy, which is basically what's going on with acupuncture is that we're inserting needles in the body related to the nervous system but not entirely part of the nervous system.

And what happens is it's like catching a fish on the line when you're out fishing; you feel that tug, initially. You'll feel that after I insert the needle. You'll feel kind of a distending. FAITH: Will it be pain? So it won't be, really, pain? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: It's different. You have to educate yourself. At first, it will be unfamiliar. So you might want to rush into thinking that, quot;Oh, is this painful? Well, no, actually, no.quot; So you know, you get used to it. And it's kind of an achy feeling. And that's what we want. If we don't get that, we're not really giving a treatment that can be as effective as if we do get that. And sometimes some needles are more guide needles so we need to get the chi effect at that needle more than, say, another needle. FAITH: How deep does it go? Is each one different? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: Every situation calls for a different, kind of, sized needle maybe a different depth, so we're going to put them in in a way where they don't even break blood vessels. Because they're rounded at the tip, they aren't pointed like a hypodermic needle, so when they are inserted it usually pushes everything out of the way in the way that we insert them.

FAITH: And how long for each treatment? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON: About 45 minutes. Sometimes we retain the needles for 30 minutes, but usually about 45 minutes. And we try to use as few as possible, so, you know, we don't put a lot of needles in. Maybe six to eight. That's about it. FAITH: OK. I do have a question: Why do the overthecounter treatments. Why, in your opinion, or your expert opinion, do they; have they not worked? And do they work for some women? NANCY ANANDA STEVENSON:Well, I think that they do work for some women. Some women just have; they can have an issue where, you know, they just got married and quot;honeymoon syndromequot; or something. Or, you know, they took antibiotics and they never really took antibiotics and they developed a yeast infection. Some women go on birth control pills and birth control pills are something they're not used to and they develop one. There can be varying reasons. Maybe it's very hot and they're wearing the wrong kind of underwear, you know; there can just be a lot of issues. And so for somebody with a chronic one, it's usually more of a systemic problem and it's related to stress and it can be kind of a psychoemotional issue or it also can be just the way somebody is just operating their life and they might have more of a sympathetic reaction to life. Text on Screen: To continue watching the interview proceed to Chapter 3.

Can I Treat My Yeast Infection During My Period

Good day, Eric Bakker, naturopath, authorof Candida Crusher, with another question I get asked from time to time from my femalepatients. Can I treat my yeast infection while I'm onmy period? You can treat it while you're on your period,but I think a better time to treat a vaginal yeast infection is before your period in theproliferative phase. This is when the lining of the endometrium is starting to build up.So from ovulation through to period is a better time to treat. And in Chapter 5 of my book,Candida Crusher, you can read my unique twostep treatment for chronic vaginal yeast infection.

In the time building up to the menstrual cycleis a good time to use a kill or antifungal treatment. And in the postperiod time isa good time to do a restorative treatment or a building up treatment. And I guaranteeyou if you do three or four of these treatments concurrently for three to four months, you'regoing to notice a big improvement. So you can treat while you're on your periodand I know some females do treat regardless of whether they've got their period or not,they'll treat. But I believe a better approach is to treat premenstrual cycle and post andnot during the actual bleeding phase. But it's up to you. You can use douching protocolswhenever you want.

So, I'm going to do a lot more tutorials regardingchronic vaginal treatments because this is an area I've treated many people over an extendedperiod of time. Have a look at my book, Chapter 5, and there is a lot of material there onchronic vaginal yeast infection treatment. So I hope that answers your question. Thankyou.

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